Why Personal Branding in Your Executive Resume Makes You Easier to Hire

by Meg Guiseppi on August 15, 2008

 

With today’s shaky economy, it’s more important than ever to get out there with a resume and other career marketing communications that will truly differentiate you from the competition, while deeply aligning what you have to offer with what the job and the employer need.

Along with matching the qualifications, skill sets, and any other hard criteria hiring decision makers are looking for in the resumes they review, bring in some of your “softer” skills. Including people-to-people skills like team leadership and the ability to improve communications across operations, breathe life into a flat document and tell the reader something about who you are.

You probably know that companies are very interested in good fit these days. The standout personal traits and strengths you rely on to get things done are valued and can be as important as what you’re actually able to accomplish.

Doesn’t it make sense that if your resume gives some indication of the kind of person you are and what you’re like to work with, and the other resumes being reviewed don’t, you’ll be more appealing?

Personal branding generates the kind of chemistry that evidences good fit and attracts the kind of attention you deserve.

Linking your personal brand with your value proposition seals the deal. Here’s what this powerhouse combination does to make them take notice of you:

Shows them the money and how you make it.

Shows them whether you’re a good fit for their corporate culture.

Shows them your unique combination of strengths, vitality, talents, and drivers that is your promise of value to them.

Shows them you’ve got the goods to significantly impact bottom line.

Shows them that hiring you is a good investment.

Related blog posts:

Embrace Your Personal Brand and Put It To Work in Your Executive Job Search

My Executive Resume Doesn’t Sound Like Me or Say Who I Really Am

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